DIY Tutorial: Girls Peplum Tankini and Bottoms

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This week, perhaps due to the Memorial Day holiday, has just flown by and I can’t recall anything particularly special about it (aside from remembering our Soldiers and Veterans), what with it being jumbled together with the repetitious motions of LIFE and having a husband MIA for most of it due to a business trip.  Oh yes, there was a “memorable” incident that will be, I only hypothesize, the first of many more to come, and I chuckle now, but I do dread the days when drama will set up house in my home.  Of course my house is filled with drama now, but this is drama of a different sort of which I speak.  My 6 year old decided he would run away and handed me a note which stated he no longer loved me and that he would leave and never return because I didn’t take him to Burger King after school.  And the punchline is this: there was a girl from his class he wanted to go with.  He would abandon mom for a girl!  Too soon!  Okay, maybe he just really wanted to eat a burger, but I admit I chuckled to think my son had so easily pushed aside me, his mom, for a girl and a burger.  Then it dawned on me that this was a foreshadowing of events to come.  He is my little momma’s boy now but I will have to move aside sooner of later… and so goes life.  It definitely is a reminder to cherish this time of innocence and sweetness of my children before they all grow up and decide mom’s no longer cool.  ha.

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Now on to the swimsuit.  Does this apple fabric look familiar to you?  If you’ve browsed through my “DIY Tutorial” page, you might have seen this same fabric for another swimsuit I made several years ago for my now 5 yr old.  It has recently been retired due to major wedgie issues so I wanted to try another swimsuit project for my C because it’s been in the 50’s/60’s here and that’s perfect weather for swimming in a “supposedly” heated pool!  (sarcasm)  Finally, today was the first day in weeks where I was able to take off my sweater and sit outside in the sun without freezing my butt off, so what better way to welcome the return of our sun than to make a swimsuit!  I tried to find cute swim fabric at Joann, but was disappointed with how unappealing and boring all their active fabrics were and ended up getting some solid pink active fabric; because you can never go wrong with pink with my girls.  I racked my brain and scoured the internet for some ideas for a solid colored swimsuit and was left unimpressed and uninspired.  As luck would have it, I found the remnants of this apple swim fabric left over from my previous swimsuit venture and after some careful measuring, was able to use almost every inch of that scrap of fabric to make this cute swimsuit for my little C.  The peplum idea came out of necessity because I wouldn’t have been able to cut one continuous piece for a tank with the scrap fabric, but cutting separate pieces for the peplum worked beautifully.

To make your girl’s swimsuit, you will need some swim (knit) fabric that has a a good amount of stretch in all directions.  I probably made this swimsuit (3T) with about a quarter of a yard of fabric remnants, but I really had to cut and measure carefully.  I didn’t use any elastic because the fabric has great stretch and fits her nice and snug and I used bias tape for binding the upper edges of the tank which extends into a ribbon to tie behind the neck.

Materials:

  • about 1/2 yard of swim fabric (depends on the size of your child)
  • bias tape
  • coordinating thread

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Please excuse C’s cute elephant undies, but this is what I used to make my pattern for the swim bottoms.  Add seam allowance and trace around the undies, then cut out the pattern and fold it in half, vertically.  Trim so both halves are identical; that way you have an even piece that’s not lopsided. This is the back piece for the swim bottom.

∗Pick a pair of undies that fit nice and not too loose, then you won’t have to add elastic to the leg opening and waist and your life will be a lot easier.

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Trace your back bottom piece onto a new piece of freezer paper, then using the undies as a guide, draw a curve (like above) for the front bottom piece on one side of the leg opening.

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Cut out the pattern piece, fold it in half vertically, then trace and cut the same curve on the other side of the leg opening to complete your front bottom pattern piece.

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Now, please excuse C’s little undershirt.  Use a tank top that fits nicely, not too tight and not too loose, fold it in half and trace, adding seam allowance.  I traced right at the edge of the tank top and didn’t add extra seam allowance because this undershirt is a bit loose on C and I don’t want the tankini to be too loose.

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So you should now have pattern pieces that look like this.  I used the same top pattern piece for both the front and the back and later ended up slashing the tank pattern piece across the waist to make a peplum.

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Draw a straight, horizontal line across the top of the tank perpendicular to the armpit point of the tank, as shown above.  That will be your pattern piece for the back of the tankini.  Then figure out where the waist is on your tank piece and draw another horizontal line across so you have a tankini bodice and the lowest third of the pattern piece will be the peplum.  Make sure to cut your upper bodice piece at the waistline (2nd line) that you drew.  Your peplum skirt piece should be 1.5x the width of your entire bodice width and cut 2.

* just fold down the pattern piece at the lines when cutting out your back and Peplum pieces.

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You should have a front bodice, back bodice, 2 peplum skirts, a front bottom, and a back bottom piece.  Make a center mark on the bottom hem of your front and back bodice pieces and for the upper hem of your peplum skirts.

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Take your peplum skirt and run a gather stitch (zero tension, longest stich 4) and pull the thread to make even gathers.  Repeat for the other skirt piece.

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With right sides together, pin one skirt piece to the front bodice piece, evenly distributing the gathers and matching the center marks.  Repeat with the 2nd peplum skirt and the back bodice piece.

∗I used a zigzag stretch stitch and straight stretch stitch to allow the fabric to stretch throughout this project.

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Sew the skirt and the bodice pieces together and you can already see it coming together nicely!

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With right sides together, pin the sides of the front and back tankini pieces and stitch.  Hem the peplum skirt piece if desired.  I was indecisive but ended up hemming mine.

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Pin bias tape to the raw edges of the back and underarms area but leave the neckline.  Sew it together.

∗Upon completing the swimsuit, I would have the neck-tie extend from this strip of bias tape rather than the neckline binding, so the tie will naturally extend to the back of the neck.

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Pin a long piece of bias tape to the neckline that extends beyond the neckline of the tank to create the tie.

∗In hindsight, I would have the tie extend from the back and underarm (in the previous step) bias tape instead, so the tie is not warped when tied behind the neck.

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Pin the bottom pieces with right sides together then sew the sides and the bottom of the pieces together.

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Fold over about 1/4-1/2 inch of the the leg openings and stitch.  (If your leg openings are loose around your child’s thighs, then you will have to make a casing and add elastic)

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Fold over 1/2″ of the waist hem, pin, and stitch in place.  (Again, if the waist is too loose on your child, then you will have to make a casing and add elastic) That’s why we used undies that fit nicely so we can make use of the stretch already in the fabric to keep the bottoms from falling off and having to add elastic (which can be a pain).

And it’s done!  It was really a quick afternoon project with no elastic, buttons, clasps, etc.  Super simple and super cute!  I love the way it turned out and now big sis wants a swimsuit like this too!  Too bad I’m out of this adorable apple fabric.

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Thanks for reading! Have an awesome weekend!!!  Maybe it’ll be warm enough to go swimming! (One can hope)

-Flora

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DIY Tutorial: Girl’s Tunic Dress

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I have a growing problem: I like to hoard pretty fabric.  The clothes that I used to toss into the “donate” bag are being stored in every nook and cranny of our home if there’s even an inch of fabric to be salvaged; all because I will “someday” make use of the fabric to upcycle the garment and give it new life.  I think the TLC show “Buried Alive” may soon come knocking at my door if I don’t start whipping out some projects from this stash.  So I decided to use hubby’s old, nice, striped dress shirt with some floral fabric from my other stash to make a tunic dress for my little A.  My little princess loves dresses and every day is a battle to get her to wear pants with the much cooler weather that has been blowing into the bay area as of late.  I am usually successful in threatening convincing her to wear pants or leggings under her dress but my victory only lasts a couple hours when she takes them off at preschool.  I hope to whip out many more dresses and skirts for my girls so I can reduce the ever-growing pile of “fabric” in our already cramped home.

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Here’s hubby’s shirt that he doesn’t wear anymore because it wrinkles too easily? Sure~ I’ll take it!

I originally used a tunic block pattern from the book: “Pattern Making for Kids’ Clothes” but ended up using one of A’s play dresses to make adjustments after cutting the fabric because it would have been much too big for my A.  The book does a great job in explaining the purpose of a block and sloper (which I had never heard of before… linguistics major here) as well as how to use these basics to create an entirely unique design.  This book was also a loan from my library and it really makes me feel like I’ve hit the jackpot when I can gain access to these awesome pattern books without having to buy the book myself!  I love shared reading. 🙂

To make your own pattern from an existing dress, just fold the dress in half, lengthwise, trace, and add seam allowance.  I ended up doing basically that since the tunic block needed to be adjusted due to it being too big.

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Tunic dresses like these are my favorite to make and to put on my little girls. I love pockets on dresses too and my A totally agrees.

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Trace the tunic block and make adjustments to make a tunic dress.

I printed the tunic block following the link given in the book, pieced it together, traced it onto freezer paper, then made my adjustments.  This tunic block is the 5-6yrs size and it was much, much too big for my 5 yr old.  I wanted to make a tunic dress so I lengthened the skirt, slashed through the armpit of the pattern to make a separate bodice, and added 1.5″ to the skirt width to make gathers (since it’s on a fold, you would be adding 3″ of fabric for gathers).

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After all the adjustments for the front of the tunic dress.

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Trace the back tunic block and make adjustments, keeping in mind the foldovers for button plackets

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I did basically the same thing for the back of the tunic: lengthened the skirt, slashed horizontally through arm curve, added 1.5″ width to make the skirt gathers.  But this time, I adjusted the back bodice portion so I have enough fabric to fold under twice and overlap for buttons and button holes.

Add 1.5″ from the first line for one side of the back bodice, then add another 1″ from the middle line you just drew for the other side of the back bodice. Make sure you cut mirror images of the bodice pieces, one should have a longer “flap”.

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These are my pieces all ready to go.

I ended up having to adjust and cut a narrower shoulder width for the bodices later…  Also, eyeballed and cut out a pocket pattern and used the sleeve from the tunic block, just shortened it since it came as a long sleeve.

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Iron 1/2″ then 1″ for both sides of back bodice.

Add a strip of interfacing to the buttons/buttonhole plackets and then iron a 1/2″ then 1″ to the main bodice line for bodice with the shorter flap.  Do the same thing for the other bodice: you fold over 1/2″ then 1″ and iron.

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line it up to overlap an inch. Should match your front bodice piece.

You should have a 1″ overlap of the back bodice like in the picture above so you can have your buttons on the bottom placket and buttonholes on the top placket.

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pin and sew across shoulders

With right sides of fabric facing, sew the shoulder seams.  See how wide the shoulders are?  I cut it down to size using a nice fitting dress as reference after I had already sewed the shoulders together.  Zigzag stitch raw edges.

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Pin the two back bodice pieces together or you can baste it together, if you prefer.

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Gather stitch

Stitch straight across the top of the skirt piece for both the front and back skirt pieces using a long stitch length (4) and “0” tension.

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Pull threads to gather

Pull the thread on the ends to make gathers and evenly distribute them to fit the width of the bottom of bodice.

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attach skirt to bodice front and back. Skirts are still two separate pieces.

Pin the two skirt pieces separately onto the bodice front and the bodice back with rights sides facing.  Then stitch in place.  Zigzag stitch raw edges.

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topstitch skirt seam to bodice.

Iron the seam up towards the bodice then topstitch along the edge of the bodice close to the skirt.

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attach sleeves to armholes.

Pin your sleeves onto the armhole curve and stitch in place.  Zigzag stitch raw edges.

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prepare pockets

Prepare you pockets by ironing your raw edges onto the wrong side of the pocket.  You can baste the edges if you want to.  I added elastic to the top of the pocket to create gathers and also to give it stretch when the hand goes into the pocket.  Forgot to take pictures of that step.  Basically, cut a thing strip of elastic to the width you want the pocket top to be, pin the elastic to both top ends of the pocket, pin the middle of the elastic to match the middle of the pocket top, then stretch the elastic as you sew it onto the pocket top.  Here’s an example tutorial by Indiesew.  They use it on knits, but basically the same thing I’m doing here.

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prepare pockets and attach to skirt. I did it at the end, but it may be easier while two skirts are not attached.

Find where you want to place your pockets on the front of your skirt, pin it on, and stitch in place.  Think where their hands would naturally fall.

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sew on the pockets

Backstitch a small triangle into the top corners of the pocket for added durability.

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Finish neckline

Cut out a strip of 1.75″ wide fabric and make your double fold bias tape then pin and stitch in place.

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sew sides of skirt all the way to the bottom of the sleeves. I wasn’t going to do sleeves but changed my mind later so this picture doesn’t show sleeves.

Sew the skirt sides and the lower sleeves together with right sides facing.  Zigzag stitch raw edges.

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sew on the “hem” part of skirt.

I cut out about a 2″ strip of fabric to match the width of the skirt to hem the bottom for a cleaner look.

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finish the hem

Fold and iron at the seam then iron the raw edge onto the wrong side, pin, and sew.  Hem your sleeve as well by folding in and ironing about 1/4″ of the raw edge onto the wrong side then folding in and ironing again about 1/2″, pin and sew.

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find desired button placement

Now figure out how many buttons you want and place them on the back bodice.

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mark where you want your button holes

Carefully mark where the buttonholes need to go, make you button holes, and sew on your buttons.

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Finish buttonholes and add buttons!

Finished buttons and buttonholes always leaves me with such a sense of accomplishment!  Perhaps because I was afraid to buttonholes for the looooongest time.

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Voila~ Done!

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My little girl wanted to wear it to school the next day and I couldn’t say no when she was so willing to wear her denim leggings under them and put on her cardigan.  Good thing I took pictures of her in the dress before school because when I picked her up, she had pink glittery paint all over her dress.  I started to worry the paint wouldn’t wash off and couldn’t get my mind off of the paint the entire drive home.  Needless to say, I hand-washed the dress right when we got home and the paint did come off with a bit of scrubbing.  Don’t worry, I won’t freak out next time.  It’s just the day after I finished it, so I was a bit sensitive (and sleep-deprived).  🙂

Go ransack your hubby, brother, whoever’s closet and there’s bound to be shirts they don’t wear that have perfectly good fabric for making children’s clothes.

Until next time… Have a great week and thanks for reading!

-Flora

Castella Cake + Whipped Cream = Korean Bakery Cake

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My youngest just had a birthday and the baby in our family has turned a whopping 3 years old!  It’s hard to believe that this spunky little “baby” is already a little human-in-training: walking, running, eating like there’s no tomorrow, talking, and asking the most annoying question in the cutest little voice, “why?” on repeat, constantly, like a broken record. I love this little person so much and enjoyed a little moment of nostalgia this morning as I held her asleep in my arms; her warm, snuggle-y little body resting against my chest in a deep, sweet slumber.  I didn’t want to move until I finally accepted the reality that it was time to pick up my #2 from preschool and hoped that I might be successful in transferring my sleeping “baby” to her carseat without waking her so it could count for her nap for the day.  She has always been pretty good at transferring and continued to sleep until we got to big sis’s school, so thankfully, we didn’t have a cranky 3 yr old throwing tantrums left and right due to an inadequate nap tonight.

Months before my little C’s birthday, her two older siblings had already started planning her birthday party, including the theme, colors, cake, and friends to invite, when I hadn’t the tiniest inkling of throwing a big party for my 3 year old.  Perhaps it’s her fateful lineup as the youngest of the three children in the family, because I do recall throwing a big party for my first on his 3rd birthday, and a smaller party for my second on her 3rd as well… This time with my third child, I thought, I’ll invite a few of her friends over for a little playdate and make a special day for her, which I hope to accomplish this week…I hope. But rest assured, we did have a family birthday party for my little pup with a special dinner, cake, presents, and even invited grandma, her favorite person!

Now on to the cake!  Korean bakery cakes with their light, sponge cake layers frosted with fresh whipped cream and decorated with a variety of colorful fruit nestled into more mounds of cream all covered with a little shaving of chocolate, are one of my favorite cakes.  It might top a deep dark chocolate cake with dark chocolate frosting on certain days.  When I got into baking, one of my first recipe quests was to find that right sponge cake to make one of those Asian bakery copycat cakes.  I’ve tried a variety of sponge cakes, with and without soaking cake layers in sugar syrup, and none of them made the cut… until I figured out I could use this Castella recipe to make my fresh cream cake.  And it is perfect!  You don’t need any sugar syrup to soak the cake layers and you don’t get dry cake when you don’t use the sugar syrup.  What you do get is a beautiful, soft, moist, yet well structured sponge cake that tastes just right with the fresh whipped cream I like to slather on to turn it into a cake.  Castella is normally a popular Japanese cake (with Portuguese roots); it’s not frosted but is baked in a square or rectangle, chilled, sliced, and eaten with a cup of tea or milk.  You can use this recipe to do just that by baking it in a square pan OR you can bake it in two 8″ round cake pans to make a layered cake even better than the ones at the Korean bakeries!

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Prep: Grease and line your cake pans, sift your cake flour, microwave the milk, mirin, and butter.

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Separate your eggs, place 8 yolks in mixer bowl and set the whites aside.

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Whisk the yolks with sugar, honey, and salt until pale yellow and ribbons fall when you lift the whisk. Set aside.

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Whisk the only 1/2 cup of the egg whites in a clean and dry mixer bowl with clean and dry whisk attachment

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Add sugar when it starts to foam.

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Whisk the egg whites until soft peaks form. Lift your whisk and the peak should gently fall over.

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Add a third of the whites into the yolk mixture, gently fold in, fold in half of the cake flour, gently fold in, then repeat ending with the remaining egg whites.

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Add a big dollop of the cake batter into the melted milk, mirin, and butter mixture and mix. Pour it into the cake batter and gently fold in.

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Pour batter into prepared cake pans and drop onto the counter several times.

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Bake 350°F for 10 mins then lower heat to 335°F and bake for another 15 mins

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Whip your cream and add sugar and vanilla. Whip until soft peaks form

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To make lemon whipped cream filling, fold 1/2 cup of lemon curd to 1½ cups of the whipped cream in a separate bowl

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I got that glass round from the dollar store and it’s a perfect 8″! I think it’s actually a cutting board. And using a nonskid mat works wonders when decorating a cake.

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Once you cake is completely cool, slice each cake in half to make a 4 layered cake.

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Smear a dollop of cream to the cake round so the cake will stick

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Add a layer of cake. I should have had the cut side facing up…

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Make a little dam by piping an edge around the perimeter of the cake then spread the lemon filling into the middle. You can use just regular whipped cream for the filling as well.

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I added raspberries that I split in half.

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Repeat the process for two more layers

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Add the last layer then you will frost the entire cake.

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Place a generous scoop of whipped cream to the top and let it fall over the edge

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carefully cover the sides of the cake. Use lots of frosting and don’t let the spatula touch the cake or you will introduce cake crumbs into the pretty frosting.

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Use a spatula to smooth out the top and the sides. I like to use a handheld pastry scraper to hold it along the side of the cake while I turn the cake turntable. Using a hot spatula also creates a smooth finish.

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Decorate it any way you want!

Castella Cake
  • 2½ TB milk
  • 2 TB mirin
  • 1½ TB unsalted butter
  • 1 cup + 1 TB cake flour, sifted 2-3 times
  • 8 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar, separated (see directions)
  • 2 TB honey
  • pinch of salt
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Prepare cake pans by greasing and lining all sides with parchment paper. (I just line the bottom and use a sharp knife to run around the sides for the cake since I’ll be covering it with frosting)
  2. Combine milk, mirin, and butter in a microwave-safe bowl and melt in microwave for 40 secs (until melted) then set aside to cool.  Sift the cake flour 2-3 times onto a piece of wax paper and set aside.
  3. In a clean mixing bowl, place all 8 egg yolks, 1/3-1/2 cup sugar (more or less depending on your sweetness preference), honey, and a pinch of salt and mix on medium to high speed until it turns a very pale yellow and starts to show peaks. If you don’t have another mixing bowl, then transfer the yolk mixture to a large bowl and wash this mixing bowl and dry it very well (also the whisk attachment).
  4. Place only 1/2 cup of egg whites into clean and dry mixer bowl (save the rest of the whites for another use), and beat with whisk attachment until it starts to foam.  Then slowly add 1/3 cup of sugar and beat only until SOFT peaks form.  The peak should fall over when you lift the whisk upright and not stand stiff and straight, so watch your whites carefully.
  5. Add a third of the egg whites meringue to the yolk mixture and quickly but gently, fold it in.  Then add half of the sifted cake flour and also quickly but gently fold in.  Repeat with another third of the meringue and the rest of the cake flour then end with the remaining meringue.
  6. Add a large dollop of the cake batter to the melted milk, mirin, butter mixture and mix it together.  Then add the milk mixture back to the cake batter and gently fold it in.
  7. Pour the cake batter into the prepared pans then drop the pans down onto the counter a few times.
  8. Bake the cake at 350°F for 10 mins then lower the heat to 335°F and bake for another 15 mins.  The cake should be done when it’s golden brown and springs back up when gently pressed.
  9. Allow cake to cool in the pan for 10 mins then gently remove from pan to finish cooling on a cooling rack.
Whipped Cream
  • 3 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1/3 cup powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ cup lemon curd (optional for filling)
  1. Whip the cream until it foams then add the powdered sugar and vanilla and whip until soft peaks form.  Don’t overwhip or it’ll curdle.
  2. To make the Lemon curd cream, add 1½ cups of the above whipped cream to a bowl and fold in ½ cup lemon curd. Use this cream to fill your layered cake.
  3. Use the rest of the whipped cream to frost the outside of your cake.
  4. Decorate ! Conjure up your creative side~

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Oh, and did I mention that refrigeration does wonders for this cake?  No more hard cake straight out of the fridge!  I used to have a strawberry flavor oil? and when I added it to the whipped cream after whipping it, it tasted SO good when I made this cake with strawberries instead of raspberries and no lemon curd, just whipped cream filling.

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We are a bookworm family so please excuse all the books scattered on the table. They were some of the gifts little C received for her bday. 🙂

Pink Pillows of Nostalgia

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Boy, was this last week a blur of running around from morning til evening every day carting my older two kids to their respective schools, carting them back, errands, work, carting them to their activities, making multiple trips to almost every store within a 15 mile radius, planning a picnic, and feeling guilty for dragging my 2 (almost 3) yr old everywhere, so taking her to our local library for storytime.  This week should slow down a bit and I’m really looking forward to that. My daughter’s preschool had a Spring Social this past Saturday where current and new, incoming families join together for a little picnic and fun.  We had a great time with snow-cones, face painting, food, friends, and chicks hatching!  Yes, you read that right! Baby Chicks!  The preschoolers got to watch one of the chicks actually hatch out of it’s shell!  I must say, what impeccable timing, chicks!  The chicks’ due date had come and gone last Wednesday, so we were afraid they wouldn’t hatch and the kids would be disappointed.  At least they would get a heavy lesson on the ways life out of the experience, but the chicks decided to come so we were able to save that heavy life lesson for another day.  Not all chicks are fluffy and yellow as I had believed them to be, for these were black and cute and amazing to watch.

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peep peep!

When I was at BYU for college (not so long ago… okay… it was many years back), I would oftentimes indulge in those soft, fluffy, melt-in-your-mouth sugar cookies heaped with a generous slathering of pink (artificial) icing, topped with cute little sprinkles, and I must admit those indulges happened a little too often.  I still see copycat versions of these pink pillows of nostalgia at my local grocery store, and perhaps my taste buds have grown up, but now these cookies taste… *blah* to me.  That could also be the effect of actually looking at the list of ingredients and wondering ‘What in the world did I put in my body all those years? No wonder I’m…’

I’m not sure what they put into their cookies to make them so soft because I don’t think it’s possible to achieve that kind of softness without adding “other” ingredients into your dough.  But I’m ready with my go-to sugar cookies recipe whenever I catch myself eyeing those pink, frosted cookies made from “others” at the grocery store and this is one of the recipes I made for my daughter’s preschool’s Spring Picnic last Saturday.  This recipe uses regular all-purpose flour with no dough refrigeration time and the other one I like to use calls for cake flour and refrigeration time, which I don’t always have the patience for when I’m baking in a hurry; which is quite almost, always. So this recipe is my all-time go-to for pink, frosted, cut-out sugar cookies, and can’t forget the sprinkles to complete the look.  😉

The dough comes together beautifully for this recipe and, as I already mentioned, you don’t need to refrigerate the dough to roll-out and cut shapes.  Also, the dough doesn’t stick when you roll it out and the cookies actually hold their shape after being baked!  And did I mention that they taste delicious!  Let them sit overnight in an airtight container and you’ll get an entirely soft cookie.  They are great right out of the oven too.  What is there not to love about this recipe?!

Soft Cut-out Sugar COokies
  • 1 cup butter, room temp
  • 1 ¾ cups granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 5½ cups all-purpose flour
  1. Preheat oven to 375ºF
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour with salt and baking soda and mix, set aside.
  3. Cream the butter and sugar together in a stand mixer with beater attachment until light and fluffy.
  4. Add eggs one at a time and beat to incorporate.
  5. Add vanilla and sour cream and beat to mix.
  6. Add the flour mixture and carefully mix on lowest speed.  Add more flour (a tablespoon) at a time if sticky, but don’t add too much!
  7. Roll out dough to 1/4″-1/3″ thickness and cut out in desired shapes
  8. GREASE parchment paper on cookie sheets and bake 6-7 mins.
  9. Let cool for 5 mins before transferring to cooling rack.
Fluffy Buttercream
  • 1 cup butter, room temp
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 4 cups powdered sugar
  • generous pinch of fine grain salt
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  1. Beat butter until light and fluffy
  2. Add powdered sugar and vanilla and beat
  3. Add salt and heavy cream and beat.
  4. Tint to desired color and frost cooled cookies.
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After you make your dough, lightly dust a piece of parchment paper with flour and get a hunk of dough ready to roll.

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Press it down and slightly flatten with your hands to make it easier to roll out.

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I like to place another sheet of parchment paper over the dough to roll it out. That way, it definitely doesn’t stick to my rolling pin.

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Peel off the top parchment (if you used one), then cut out into desired shapes. I stuck with circles this time.

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My little pretties ready to go into the oven.

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See how nicely they retained their shape (it’s easier to tell with other shapes, I suppose).

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Close-up of my pretty cookie 😉

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I baked these for 6 mins at 375 F

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While your cookies cool, whip up your buttercream and tint to desired color.

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Frost your cookies and top with colorful sprinkles

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Then eat, enjoy, and leave the grocery store pink “others” alone!

Thank you for reading and have another wonderful week, hopefully with some homemade sweetness along the way~

-Flora